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Virus Hoaxes

 

Three Rules of Anti-virus Programs:
  1. Have one.
  2. Keep it up to date! (daily or weekly)
  3. Be sure the information you get in an email is valid before you do something to your computer or forward the message to all of your friends. If you have any doubts, err on the side of caution. "Be safe not sorry."
Put a stop to Junk Email - before you download it!

The "sulfnbk.exe virus" is a hoax:
Usually an email that gets mailed in chain letter fashion describing some devastating highly unlikely type of virus. You can usually spot a hoax because there's no file attachment, no reference to a third party who can validate the claim and the general 'tone' of the message.

CAUTIONS:

  • This particular email message is a hoax. The file that is mentioned in the hoax, however, Sulfnbk.exe, is a Microsoft Windows utility that is used to restore long file names, and like any .exe file, it can be infected by a virus that targets .exe files.
  • The virus/worm W32.Magistr.24876@mm can arrive as an attachment named Sulfnbk.exe. The Sulfnbk.exe file used by Windows is located in the C:\Windows\Command folder. If the file is located in any other folder, or arrives as an attachment to a email message, then it is possible that the file is infected. In this case, if a scan with the latest virus definitions and with NAV set to scan all files does not detect the file as being infected, quarantine and submit the file to SARC for analysis by following the instructions in the document How to submit a file to SARC using Scan and Deliver.
  • If you have deleted the Sulfnbk.exe file from the C:\Windows\Command folder and want to know how to restore the file, see the How to restore the Sulfnbk.exe file section below.


Examples

Version 1

Dear So-and-so:
This is very real, and I may have passed it on to you. Check it out as below right now. Your drive may crash!!
"I had a virus which apparently attaches itself to everyone in my address book. I deleted it successfully. you may have it as well. Follow these instructions to see if you have it. It transfers to whomever is in your address book. It lies dormant for 14 days, then kills your hard drive. If you've got it send these instructions to everyone in you address book. Otherwise, it may be sent back to you by somebody else.
1. go to start-then to "find or search" 2. in the "search for files or folders" type in sulfnbk.exe - this is the name of the virus. 3. in the "look in" make sure you're searching drive C
4. hit "search" button ))or find_
5. if this file shows up (it's an ugly blackish icon that will have the name sulfnbk.exe) DON'T OPEN IT
6. right click on the file - go down to delete and left click
7. It will ask if you want to send it to the recycle bin - yes
8. go to your desktop (where all your icons are) and double-click on the recycle bin
9. right click on sulfnbk.exe and delete again or just empty the recycle bin
IF YOU FIND THIS.....SEND IT TO EVERYONE IN YOUR ADDRESS BOOK, BECAUSE THAT'S HOW IT IS TRANSFERRED.

Version 2

Dear So-and-so:
Do you believe that a friend of mine sent me an alert and the procedure that we have to follow for the possible infection of SULFNBK.EXE. And I had checked, just to make sure. An then... the file was there, hidden even of McAfee and Norton, maybe waiting something to start work.
Well, see bellow the procedure that I followed step by step, and I found the file:

1. Start/Find Folders. Type the file name: SULFNBK.EXE
2. If it find, open Windows Explorer, browse into the folder where the file is and delete it. Do not click with left button on the file and do not open it.
3. Just delete it
4. Mine was on Windows/Command
5. The virus from the person who gave the alert was on Windows/Config

Yes, Norton and McAfee do not detect it.
We do not know if it makes some damage on the machine, but I think that anybody will not want to test it to know, will it?
Folks, this is not fun, I deleted it from my computer.
And my definitions are updated.
Do the same, ok?

How to restore the Sulfnbk.exe file
If you have deleted this file, restoration is optional. Sulfnbk.exe is a Microsoft Windows utility that is used to restore long file names. It is not needed for normal system operation. If you want to restore it, there is more than one way to do this. See the information that follows.

NOTE: The instructions in this document are provided for your convenience. The extraction of Windows files uses Microsoft programs and commands. Symantec does not provide warranty support for or assistance with Microsoft products. If you have any questions, please see your Windows documentation or contact Microsoft.

Windows Me
If you are using Windows Me, you can restore the file using the System Configuration Utility.

    1. Click Start and then click Run.
    2. Type msconfig and then press Enter.
    3. Click Extract Files. The "Extract one file from installation disk" dialog box appears.
    4. In the "Specify the system file you would like to restore" box, type the following, and then click Start:

    c:\windows\command\sulfnbk.exe

    NOTE: If you installed Windows to a different location, make the appropriate substitution.

    The Extract File dialog box appears.

    5. Next to the "Restore from" box, click Browse, and browse to the location of the Windows installation files. If they were copied to the hard drive, this is, by default, C:\Windows\Options\Install. You can also insert the Windows installation CD in the CD-ROM drive and browse to that location.
    6. Click OK and follow the prompts.

Windows 98
If you are using Windows 98, you can restore the file using the System File Checker.

    1. Click Start and then click Run.
    2. Type sfc and then press Enter.
    3. Click "Extract one file from installation disk."
    4. In the "Specify the system file you would like to restore" box, type the following, and then click Start:

    c:\windows\command\sulfnbk.exe

    NOTE: If you installed Windows to a different location, make the appropriate substitution.

    The Extract File dialog box appears.

    5. Next to the "Restore from" box click Browse, and browse to the location of the Windows installation files. If they were copied to the hard drive, this is, by default, C:\Windows\Options\Cabs. You can also insert the Windows installation CD in the CD-ROM drive and browse to that location.
    6. Click OK and follow the prompts.


Windows 95 (or alternative method for Windows 98/Me)
If you are using Windows 95, you need to use the extract command. This can also be used on Windows 98/Me.

    1. Click Start, point to Find or Search, and then click Files or Folders.
    2. Make sure that "Look in" is set to (C:) and that Include subfolders is checked.
    3. In the "Named" or "Search for..." box, type:

    precopy1

    4. Click Find Now or Search Now. If it does not exist on the hard drive, then insert the Windows installation CD and repeat the search on that drive.
    5. When you find the file, write down the location of Precopy1, for example, C:\Windows\Options\Cabs. This is your Source Path.
    6. The general form of the Extract command is:

    extract /a <Source Path>\precopy1.cab sulfnbk.exe /L c:\windows\command

    NOTE: Make sure that you include the /a switch, as shown. Depending on your version of Windows, the Sulfnbk,exe file can be in a .cab file other than Precopy1.cab. By using the /a switch, the Extract program will look first in the Precopy1.cab, and if the file is not found there, it will look in all subsequent .cab files until it is found, and can be extracted.

    So if the source path is C:\Windows\Options\Cabs, then the Extract command becomes:

    extract /a c:\windows\options\cabs\precopy1.cab sulfnbk.exe /L c:\windows\command

    NOTE: If you installed Windows to a different location, make the appropriate substitution.

    7. Click Start and then click Run.
    8. Type the following, making the appropriate substitutions as previously noted

    extract /a <Source Path>\precopy1.cab sulfnbk.exe /L c:\windows\command

    9. Click OK.


For more information on how to use the Microsoft Extract command, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base document, How to Extract Original Compressed Windows Files, Article ID: Q129605

Write-up by: Patrick Martin and Symantec Corporation (Norton).
Researched by Pacific Web Sites.

If you need more research click here

Researched by Pacific Web Sites. All information on this page is believed to be true, however, Pacific Web Sites can not assume any liability for its accuracy and will not be liable for any suffering caused by its contents.

Yes, we have been fooled by viruses too

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